Sign in

Marker
Pop business for the intelligent reader. A publication from Medium.

Ten years after its publication, the late anthropologist’s deconstruction of economics is more valuable than ever

Debt has recently been re-issued, ten years after its original publication in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. That event prompted much soul searching about money and a raft of books purporting to explain how we got into such a mess. Most were…


A fascinating new book paints a cautionary tale of Adam Neumann’s incredible rise and the dangers of the messianic leader

Jackal Pan/Visual China Group via Getty Images

I’d heard of WeWork but knew little about it. The buzz around it and the company’s founder Adam Neumann didn’t synch up with what appeared to be a sub-leasing firm. …


I READ IT SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO

We’ve been thinking about the government’s finances all wrong

Photo Illustration: Save As/Medium

I Read It So You Don’t Have To is a series that gives you the TL;DR on a business book you want to read — but don’t have time to.

What did I read?

The Deficit Myth: Modern Monetary Theory and the Birth of the People’s Economy by Stephanie Kelton

So who’s this Stephanie Kelton?

Stephanie Kelton is a professor of economics and public policy at Stony Brook University. She is a former chief economist on the U.S. Senate Budget Committee (Democratic Staff), and is a leading expert on Modern monetary theory (MMT), a macroeconomic framework about federal government spending.

Give me the 30-second sell.

There’s a longstanding myth that’s holding back the U.S…


I READ IT SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO

How Big Tech made it harder for working artists to make a living

Photo Illustration: Save As/Medium

I Read It So You Don’t Have To is a series that gives you the TL;DR on a business book you want to read — but don’t have time to.

What did I read?

The Death of the Artist: How Creators Are Struggling to Survive in the Age of Billionaires and Big Tech by William Deresiewicz.

So who’s this William Deresiewicz?

Deresiewicz is an essayist and critic and a former professor of English at Yale. He’s also the author of Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life and A Jane Austen Education.

Give me the 30-second sell.

Working artists are in trouble. Now, that’s not what…


Founders with a small exit in their first company were much more likely to build a unicorn in their next, a new study of startups shows

Screenshot of “The Million Dollar Homepage”


Malcolm Gladwell’s 2000 bestseller was naive about the dark side of the ideas it championed, but taught readers that books about ideas could be cool


Before winner-take-all became the name of the game, a bookseller called Ingram showed a better way

Note: This is a republication of an article that I published last week on LinkedIn Pulse exploring the limits of Amazon’s vaunted “customer obsession” when pursued at the expense of suppliers, and contrasting it with the philosophy of Ingram, the book wholesaling platform that gave Amazon its start.

A few days later, Jeff Bezos published his 2020 letter to Amazon shareholders, which almost reads like a response to my article. Though that could not have been possible given that his shareholder letter must have been well underway when my article first appeared, the update to Amazon’s thinking is very relevant…


I READ IT SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO

In ‘Hot Seat,’ Jeff Immelt gives his version of the iconic American conglomerate’s downfall

Photo Illustration: Save As/Medium

I Read It So You Don’t Have To is a new series that gives you the TL;DR on a new business book you want to read — but don’t have time to.

What did I read?

Jeff Immelt’s new memoir, Hot Seat: What I Learned Leading a Great American Company, published last month.

So who’s Jeff Immelt?

Immelt, once considered a human embodiment of corporate innovation, was the ninth CEO and chairman of General Electric, the American conglomerate better known as GE, from 2001 to 2017. Having served as a manager in GE’s plastics, appliances, and health care divisions through the ’80s and ’90s, he eventually won a…


I Read It So You Don’t Have To

An economist gives a psychological tour through the messy business of numbers

Animation by Julia Moburg for Marker

I Read It So You Don’t Have To is a new series that gives you the TL;DR on a new business book you want to read—but will never have time to.

What did I read?

Tim Harford’s new book The Data Detective: Ten Easy Rules to Make Sense of Statistics (published in the U.K. as How to Make the World Add Up)

So who’s this Tim Harford?

He’s a columnist at the Financial Times, a BBC radio host, and the author of several previous books, the most recent of which is Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy and the most popular of which is probably 2005’s The Undercover…


No more doomscrolling. Read these books instead.

Looking back on 2020, I wish I’d spent half my doomscrolling time reading books instead. And by half, I mean pretty much all. I would’ve been happier — and learned more. There’s no substitute for the deep engagement and insight that comes from being immersed in another person’s stories and ideas.

To give the new year a warm welcome, here’s a preview of the winter’s new books for leaders. They’re a mix of social science and memoir — the key themes are fear and courage, isolation and inclusion, tradition and transformation, adversity and resilience, and thinking and rethinking.

Fear and courage

1. Professional…

Marker

Pop business for the intelligent reader. A publication from Medium.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store